Amtrak train in deadly wreck was speeding

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Jul 30, 2017 Voyeur Upskirt

Amtrak train in deadly wreck was speeding By Geoff Mulvihill, The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to just 50 mph, yet they still don’t know why it was going so fast. Robert Sumwalt, of the National Transportation Safety Board, said a data recorder and a video camera in the train’s front end could yield clues to what happened. Amtrak inspected the stretch of track on Tuesday, just hours before the accident, and found no defects, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. Sumwalt said the engineer applied the emergency brakes moments before the crash but slowed the train to only 102 mph by the time the locomotive’s black box stopped recording data. The speed limit just before the bend is 80 mph, he said. The attorney for the engineer at the controls of an Amtrak train that careened off the tracks while travelling at an excessive speed said Thursday his client has no recollection of the accident. Lawyer Robert Goggin told ABC News that the engineer, Brandon Bostian, 32, of New York, suffered a concussion in Tuesday night’s crash and had 15 staples in his head. “He remembers coming into curve. He remembers attempting to reduce speed and thereafter he was knocked out,” Goggin said. The lawyer said the last thing the engineer remembered was coming to, looking for his bag, retrieving his cellphone and calling 911 for help. He said the engineer’s cellphone was off and stored in his bag before the accident, as required. Goggin said that his client “co operated fully” with police and immediately consented to a blood test. He said he had not been drinking or doing drugs. Police had said on Wednesday that the engineer had refused to give a statement to law enforcement. Sumwalt said federal accident investigators want to talk to him but will give him a day or two to recover from the shock of the accident. Goggin said his client was distraught when he learned of the devastation and believes the engineer’s memory will likely return once the head injury subsides. Mayor Michael Nutter said he was frustrated to learn how fast the train was going. “Part of the focus has to be, what was the engineer doing?” Nutter said. Tuesday. Passengers crawled out the windows of the torn and toppled rail cars in the darkness and emerged dazed and bloody, from Congress and safety regulators, Amtrak had not installed along that section of track Positive Train Control, a technology that uses GPS, wireless radio and computers to prevent trains from going over the speed limit. Most of Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor is equipped with Positive Train Control. “Based on what we know right now, we feel that had such a system been installed in this section of track, this accident would not have occurred,” Sumwalt said. history: the 1943 derailment of the Congressional Limited, bound from Washington to New York. Seventy nine people were killed. Naval Academy, a Wells Fargo executive, a college administrator and the CEO of an educational startup. “We will not cease our efforts until we go through every vehicle,” the mayor said. The crash took place about 10 minutes after the train pulled out of Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station with 238 passengers and five crew members listed aboard. The locomotive and all seven passenger cars hurtled off the track as the train made a left turn, Sumwalt said. Of the engineer, Sumwalt said: “This person has gone through a very traumatic event, and we want to give him an opportunity to convalesce for a day or so before we interview him. But that is certainly a high priority for us, to interview the train crew.” Jillian Jorgensen was seated in the second passenger car and said the train was going “fast enough for me to be worried” when it began to lurch to the right. Then the lights went out, and Jorgensen was thrown from her seat. She said she “flew across the train” and landed under some seats that had apparently broken loose from the floor. Jorgensen, a reporter for The New York Observer who lives in Jersey City, New Jersey, said she wriggled free as fellow passengers screamed. Student clubs at lbs also organize several conferences on campus each essay writing service cheap for essaysheaven.com/ year

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